A detour before the ocean

I have planned to sink myself in theosophy, which I already started this week. However, I’ve encountered a book in the “reading with priority” folder, namely, the Five world religions written by Helmuth von Glasenapp. The book gives an introduction for the most wide-spread recent religions, with additional comments to each one by the others. The book exactly gave me what I was expecting, well-estabilished descriptions, and more or less a dissatisfaction about each religion with respect to its principles. Thanks to the book though, I was given more insight on hinduism, taoism and islam, which I appreciate, and I also got some reinforcements of my thoughts about buddhism and christianity. It also pointed out the similarities, pilgrim principles and the relation of a religion and its creators. Without further critics, I recommend that book to everyone who is interested in getting to know religions other than its own. It can be an eye-opener for those who are looking for more than offering themselves to a single religion.

And now back to theosophy. I just started the first book I intended to read, The Ocean of Theosophy by William Q. Judge, and yet it seems promising. I close this post with a quote from it.

How man has come to be the complex being that he is and why, are questions that neither Science nor Religion makes conclusive answer to. This immortal thinker having such vast powers and possibilities, all his because of his intimate connection with every secret part of Nature from which he has been built up, stands at the top of an immense and silent evolution. He asks why Nature exists, what the drama of life has for its aim, how that aim may be attained. But Science and Religion both fail to give a reasonable reply. Science does not pretend to be able to give the solution, saying that the examination of things as they are is enough of a task; religion offers an explanation both illogical and unmeaning and acceptable but to the bigot, as it requires us to consider the whole of Nature as a mystery and to seek for the meaning and purpose of life with all its sorrow in the pleasure of a God who cannot be found out. The educated and enquiring mind knows that dogmatic religion can only give an answer invented by man while it pretends to be from God.

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